DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20210342

A rare case of secondary abdominal pregnancy following ruptured rudimentary horn

Anju Sreenivas, Valsa Diana G.

Abstract


Abdominal pregnancies are classified as primary or secondary of which secondary abdominal pregnancies are more common. The incidence of abdominal pregnancy varies from 1 in 372 to 1 in 9,714 live births and accounts for 1.4% of ectopic pregnancies. Rudimentary horn pregnancy occurs in approximately 1/76 000 to 1/150 000 pregnancies. Abdominal pregnancies are classified as primary or secondary of which secondary abdominal pregnancies are more common. The incidence of abdominal pregnancy varies from 1 in 372 to 1 in 9,714 live births and accounts for 1.4% of ectopic pregnancies. Rudimentary horn pregnancy occurs in approximately 1/76 000 to 1/150 000 pregnancies. We report a case of secondary abdominal pregnancy in a 24-year-old primigravida at 19 weeks gestation who was asymptomatic on admission but a known case of unicornuate uterus with rudimentary right horn. Ultrasound revealed fetus in the abdominal cavity and was confirmed by MRI. Intraoperatively, fetus was found en sac in abdominal cavity and placenta in the cavity of the ruptured right rudimentary horn which was removed in toto with the horn.


Keywords


Secondary abdominal pregnancy, Ruptured rudimentary horn, Abdominal radiography

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References


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