DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20191938

A comparative study of maternal and fetal outcomes following induction of labour versus expectant management in mild gestational hypertension at term

Anjuman Alam, Poonam Choubey

Abstract


Background: To compare the maternal and neonatal outcomes between planned induction of labour and expectant management in women with mild gestational hypertension at term.

Methods: A prospective hospital based observational study. The 120 pregnant women with mild gestational hypertension were randomized in a 1:1 ratio either to receive immediate induction of labour (group A comprising 60 women) or expectant management (group B comprising 60 women). Primary outcomes were incidence of any maternal mortality, renal failure, pulmonary oedema, need for ICU care or post-partum eclampsia and also composite maternal morbidity like severe gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, abruption and PPH. Secondary outcomes were mode of delivery, need for antihypertensives and MgSO4.

Results: Though there were no maternal death or renal or pulmonary complications in any group, progression to severe hypertension was more in group B (expectant management) compared to group A (immediate induction) (18.33% vs. 3.33%). Increased incidence of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia were noted in group B (15% and 3%) as compared to group A (0%). Incidence of Abruption and PPH was less in group A 1.67% and 5% compared to group B 3.33% and 10 % respectively. Spontaneous vaginal delivery rate was low and caesarean section rates were high in group A (61.67% and 31.67%) compared to group B (68.33% and 25% respectively). Need for antihypertensive and MgSO4 were less in group A (3.33% each) compared to group B (18.33% and 16.66% respectively).

Conclusions: Requirement of antihypertensive, progression to severe hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, use of MgSO4, incidence of abruption, PPH were less in group A compared to group B. However, induction at completion of 37 weeks may be associated with increased incidence of operative deliveries.


Keywords


Expectant management, Induction of labour, Mild gestational hypertension

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References


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